USCGAUX BANNER
District 01S   Division 11   Flotilla 02

INFORMATION

Weather Report for Brooklyn, NY                                                                                                       ANIMATED BOWLINE

In addition to using the menu on the left, please go to the 'LINKS' Page to find many sources of information. 
[under construction]

BOATING COURSES BUTTON Click  

NYS Boating Rules - Legal requirements Registrations, Safety Courses, and Required Equipment

PWC Personal Water Craft  As of 1/1/2004 anyone operating a PWC will need to complete the course.

Communications

    New RADIO protocol  -  Digital Selective Calling
                                              also  EPIRB                       (w/ link to FCC page)
 

Fishing Regulations: Seasons, Size and Possession Limits

Federal Boating Requirements

Tides (NY City area and more)     [see also 'Tides' in left table of contents for Brooklyn area]
NYC Tides - Brooklyn  TODAY
  [learn to interpret these charts - take a course today!]

Calculations & Conversions:
  Weather, Distances, Distances over horizon, temp, Nautical Miles, Wave heights,  more

Vessel Safety Checks  (for non-motorized boats, click here)

KNOTS - Animations of some knots you should know

Odds 'n Ends potpourri of info. always incomplete.

Pollution

See INDEX for so many more topics covered in this website

 description lay

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SUMMER SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
 

1. A mishap is any unplanned, unexpected, or undesirable event causing
injury, occupational illness, death, or property damage. To minimize the
chance that we will be involved in a mishap this summer, each of us must
take responsibility for identifying and managing the risks inherent in our
summertime activities. By anticipating the unexpected, and having a plan on
how we will manage changing conditions, we can greatly reduce the likelihood
that a mishap will occur. Use the following safety information to help
identify potential risks you may face this summer.

2. Heat injuries. Be aware of the dangers associated with heat exposure and
take steps to protect yourself.

 A. Heat cramps. These painful cramps occur when the body loses large
amounts of salt, minerals, and fluid. Large muscles such as the legs, arms,
and abdomen are particularly susceptible. Heat cramps can occur alone or can
be accompanied by heat exhaustion. The body temperature is usually normal.
Prevention: take frequent breaks and drink fluids. First aid: replacement of
electrolytes and fluids is a primary concern. Do not give salt tablets to
persons with high blood pressure. Salt from a normal diet is sufficient.
Drink plenty of fluid and eat foods rich in potassium.

 B. Heat exhaustion. With heat exhaustion, the victim sweats profusely,
feels weak and nauseated, and sometimes will vomit. The skin is cool, moist,
and pale. Body temperature may be slightly elevated. Prevention: reduce
workload, drink plenty of fluid and take breaks. First aid: take the victim
to a shady area and have him/her drink plenty of water to cool the body.

 C. Heat stroke. Heat stroke results when the body loses control of its
thermo-regulatory mechanism, and the main avenue of heat loss (cooling by
evaporation of sweat) is blocked. Body temperature may rise in excess of 106
degrees. This is a life-threatening emergency. The individual stops
sweating, the pulse is weak and rapid, the skin is hot and dry, and the
victim can go into convulsions or lose consciousness. Prevention: follow the
same preventive measures for heat cramps and heat exhaustion. Be wary of the
signs and symptoms as the onset of heatstroke is sudden. First aid: get
medical assistance as soon as possible. Immediately cool the body. Take the
individual to shade, loosen clothing, wet the victims skin and fan them. In
extreme cases, use an ice bath if available or immerse the victim in cool
water to reduce core temperature. One attack of heat stroke predisposes a
person to a second attack, so  avoid subsequent exposures.

3. Insect-borne disease prevention. During warmer months, insects capable of
transmitting disease are more active. The following guidance can help to
protect you against insect-borne diseases.

 A. Ticks. Ticks can carry diseases such as lyme disease, rocky mountain
spotted fever, and ehrlichiosis. Ticks are typically not found in
well-manicured lawns, but in tall grasses or brush. Avoid these areas and
use insect repellents to reduce your risk of disease. Wear light colored
clothing (allows you to see ticks crawling) and tuck pants into boots in
areas where ticks are present. After returning from tick-infested areas,
check all body parts for ticks using a hand-held or full length mirror
(especially the groin, armpit, behind the knees and in head hair). To remove
ticks safely, use fine-tipped tweezers. Grasp the tick as close to the skin
surface as possible and pull upward with steady, even pressure. Do not twist
or jerk the tick as the mouthparts could break off and remain in the skin
(if so, remove the mouthparts with tweezers). Do not squeeze, crush or
puncture the body of the tick. After removing the tick, disinfect the bite
site and wash hands with soap and water. Save the tick to assist medical
personnel in identification should illness occur.

 B. Mosquitoes. Mosquitoes can transmit diseases such as west nile virus, st
louis encephalitis, eastern equine encephalitis, dengue fever, malaria, and
yellow fever. The risk of these diseases can be significantly reduced by
eliminating mosquito breeding areas. Drain all standing water, naturally
occurring or manmade. Wear shoes, socks, long pants, and long-sleeved
shirts. Use insect repellents to reduce your risk of disease.

 C. For more information on rocky mountain spotted fever, lyme disease,
ehrlichiosis, west nile virus, dengue fever, malaria, st louis encephalitis,
and yellow fever, see the following website:

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/index.htm

4. Insect repellents and insecticides. The most effective insect repellent
ingredient is commonly known as deet. Products containing 30 to 35 percent
deet offer the best protection with the lowest possibility of side effects.
Rarely, some people may have adverse reactions to deet. Since very young
children are more vulnerable, adults should apply deet-containing repellent
to children. Don't apply deet to infants less than 2 months old. Be aware
that deet can also dissolve plastics such as watch crystals and eyeglass
lenses. Deet containing insect repellent is available in the stock system
(6840-01-284-3982).

5. Weather safety. Thunderstorms can feature winds that can exceed 100 mph
and rival the damage caused by a tornado. Flash flooding, the number one
cause of deaths associated with thunderstorms, killed more than 76 people in
2006. Tornados can produce winds in
excess of 250 mph and stay on the ground for 50 miles. Tornados caused 67
fatalities and 898 injuries in 2006, and lightning resulted in 47 fatalities
and 246 injuries.  Early warning is the key to implementing risk mitigation
strategies related to weather. Whenever your plans will take you outdoors,
review the forecast beforehand and take a weather radio with you to obtain
information on changing weather or approaching storms. More information can
be found at:

http://www.weather.gov/os/hazstats.shtml

6. Sun exposure. Sunlight contains ultraviolet (uv) radiation, which can
cause premature aging, wrinkles, cataracts, and skin cancer, including
melanoma. The american cancer society estimates that more than one million
americans get skin cancer each year, leading to over 12,000 deaths. Protect
yourself by limiting exposure between 1000 and 1600. If you must be out,
wear long sleeve shirts, long pants and a wide brim hat, or use sunscreens
with a skin protection factor (spf) of 15 or higher. Apply sunscreens 30
minutes before going out into the sun, ensure all exposed skin is covered
and reapply periodically. Wear uv-absorbent sunglasses, and remember,
sunlight reflected by water and sand exposes you to greater uv rays.  More
information can be found at:

http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/

7. Food borne illness. Be cautious about food preparation and handling.
Clean - wash hands and food preparation surfaces often. Separate - avoid
cross contamination of cooked and uncooked food during preparation, grilling
and serving - this is a prime cause of food borne illness. Cook - to ensure
that harmful bacteria is killed, use a food thermometer to ensure meats are
cooked to the proper temperature when using a grill. Chill - keep cold foods
cold. Meats and salads should be kept in an insulated cooler packed with
several inches of ice. Keep coolers out of vehicle trunks and store in a
shaded area. Replenish ice in coolers frequently to keep the temperature
range constant. Put leftover perishables back on ice once you finish eating
so they dont spoil. More information can be found at:
http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/

more information about the "critical days of summer" can be found at:

HTTP://WWW.SAFETYCENTER.NAVY.MIL/SEASONAL/CRITICALDAYS/DEFAULT.HTM    

 

 

 --- Press Release ---
 

PUBLIC COMMENT SOUGHT ON FATE OF LONG RANGE NAVIGATION SYSTEM

The land based navigation system maybe decommissioned later this year

 

The Coast Guard Auxiliary wants to inform all mariners that the US Department of Transportation, in coordination with the Department of Homeland Security, is seeking public input on the fate of the Long Range Navigation System, otherwise known as LORAN-C.

 

The land based navigation system, operated by the US Coast Guard, may be scheduled for decommissioning later this year. At question is whether the system should be decommissioned, maintained "as is," or up-graded to an enhanced LORAN system (eLORAN), which could be used either as a back-up to the GPS (Global Position Satellite) System, or a complimentary system to GPS.  .

 

The public is invited to submit their thoughts and comments, which must be received on or by February 7th of this year.  To learn how to submit those comments, visit http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/eLORAN/E6-22421.pdf, or call the U.S. Coast Guard Info line at 1-800-368-5647.

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If you just took our BOATING COURSE:   Bonus: 

Boating World Magazine Free Subscription Program

A free subscription postcard is being distributed to boating course

Graduates in every shipment of America’s Boating Course. Graduates will be entitled to a free, one-year (10 issues) of Boating World Magazine as a "thank you" from the publisher and the Coast Guard Auxiliary for taking their first steps at improving recreational boating safety.

Students who become a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary can also get a free, one-year (10 issues) of Boating World Magazine for joining.

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Any vessel or person in the water is not authorized in the following Security Zones:
• Within 150 yards of Liberty and Ellis Islands;
• United Nations, in the East River along the Manhattan shoreline from 125 yards offshore at the Queensboro Bridge to 175 yards offshore at East 35th Street;
• Within 25 yards of all bridge piers or abutments, Overhead power cable towers and Tunnel Ventilators in the waters south of the Troy, NY Locks;
• Within 100 yards of all anchored or moored Coast Guard vessels;
• Within a 100-yard radius of any Passenger Ship, or vessel or barge carrying Petroleum/Chemical Products in bulk; and
• Around Piers 84-96, Manhattan, bound by the following points: the northeast corner of Pier 96 where it intersects the seawall, thence to approximate position 40°46’23.1"N, 073°59’59.0"W, thence to approximate position 40°45’55.3"N, 074°00’20.2"W (NAD 1983), thence to the southeast corner of Pier 84 where it intersects the seawall, thence along the shoreline to the point of origin;
• The Indian Point Nuclear Power Station on the Hudson River. Within 300 yards of approximate position 41°16’12.4N, 073°57’16.2W. All vessels transiting the Hudson River in the vicinity of Indian Point are subject to random Coast Guard boardings.
• All waters of Bowery and Flushing Bays within approximately 100 yards of La Guardia Airport;
• All waters of Bergen Basin north of 40°39’26.4" N;
• All waters of Thurston Basin north of 40°38’21.2" N;
• All waters of Jamaica Bay within approximately 100 yards of John F. Kennedy Airport; and
• All waters of Eastchester Bay within approximately 100 yards of Rodman Neck, south of the City Island Bridge.
Recreational vessels are not authorized in the following Security Zones:
• All waters between the Military Ocean and Global Marine Terminals, west of the New Jersey Pierhead channel;
• Within a 25-yard radius of every waterfront facility, as defined in 33 CFR 6.01-4;
• All waters of Newark Bay, around Port Newark and Port Elizabeth, bound by the following points: from the New Jersey Turnpike Extension Bridge (approximate position 40-41-46.5N, 074-07-20.4W), following the Western edge of the Newark Bay Channel, South through can buoy #19A, lighted buoy #17, can buoy #15A, lighted buoy #7 and then west to approximate position 40-39-21.5N, 074-09-54.3W.
NAVAL VESSEL PROTECTION ZONES: The U.S. Coast Guard has established permanent Protection Zones for a distance of 500 yards around all U.S. naval vessels in navigable waters of the United States. Vessels are to proceed at a no-wake speed when within a Protection Zone. Non-military vessels are not allowed to enter within 100 yards of a U.S. naval vessel, whether underway or moored, unless authorized by an official patrol. The patrol may be either USCG or USN. A U.S. naval vessel is any vessel owned, operated, chartered, or leased by the U.S. Navy and any vessel under the operational control of the U.S. Navy or a Unified Commander.
Entry into, or movement within these zones, is prohibited without the authorization of the Coast Guard Captain of the Port or his designated on-scene representative. Persons violating this regulation are subject to a penalty of up to $50,000 and/or imprisonment for not more than 5 years.

 

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DID YOU KNOW:

REDUCED VISIBILITY:

Power Driven Vessels: 
Making way through water - one prolonged blast sounded at two-minute intervals.
Underway but stopped and making no way through the water - two prolonged blasts in succession with two second intervals between blasts sounded at two-minute intervals.

Sailboats or vessels not under command, restricted in ability to maneuver, towing or pushing another vessel, or engaged in fishing with nets or trawling:
One prolonged followed by two short blasts sounded at two-minute intervals.

Vessels at anchor:  A vessel at anchor shall at intervals of not more than one minute ring the bell rapidly for about five seconds.   Vessels over 100 feet must ring a bell in the forepart of the vessel, and immediately afterwards in the after part of the vessel.  Boats less than 12 meters (less than 40 feet) must make an efficient sound with an interval of no more than two minutes.

(from BOATUS)

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July, 06

The Negative Affects of Ethanol on Recreational Boat Fuel Systems

 

The National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA) opposes the use of marine fuels that contain greater than 10% ethanol content by volume. This position is based on safety and durability concerns and supported by many well documented studies.

 

According to state boating registrations, there are over 12 million recreational boats in the United States. Boat builders utilize five types of materials to fabricate fuel tanks. These are aluminum, steel, cross-link polyethylene, high density polyethylene and fiberglass.  For a rough estimate of today’s numbers, there are approximately four million boats that have aluminum fuel tanks; approximately seven million have steel or polyethylene tanks, and less than one million have fiberglass tanks. The data clearly indicates that the increased use of ethanol in gasoline has raised safety and durability issues for aluminum and fiberglass fuel tanks. 

 

Aluminum Fuel Tanks

 

In the case of aluminum tanks, aluminum is a highly conductive metal that relies on an oxide layer for its corrosion protection properties. Low levels of ethanol, such as E10 (10%), are usually not a problem in aluminum tanks because the oxide layer provides a good measure of protection. The problem occurs when the ethanol content is increased.

 

There are two mechanisms that occur with ethanol. Both mechanisms are a result of the hydroscopic property of ethanol, meaning it absorbs water. The more ethanol in the fuel, the more water there will be in the fuel tank. Water not only causes the tank to corrode, it also causes the corrosion particles to clog fuel filters, fuel systems, and damage engine components. The corrosion rate can be accelerated under a number of conditions if other contaminating metals are present such as copper which may be picked up from brass fittings or as a low level contaminant in the aluminum alloy. Chloride, which is a chemical found in salt water, will also accelerate corrosion. In the long term, corrosion can perforate the aluminum to produce leaks that would cause fuel to spill into the bilge and end up in the environment. In the worse case it could cause a fire and/or explosion hazard. Boat fuel tanks are often located under the deck next to the engine where the operator might not be aware of a leak until it was too late.           .  

 

The second mechanism that can occurs with the increased use of ethanol based fuel in aluminum tanks is galvanic corrosion.  Gasoline fuel is not conductive, but the presence of ethanol or ethanol and water will conduct electricity. The galvanic process that occurs to aluminum trim tabs, stern drives, shaft couplings, etc. will occur within the aluminum fuel tank. Boat builders are able to protect exterior aluminum boat equipment with sacrificial anodes known as zincs. Sacrificial anodes are not a feasible option for the interior of a fuel tank.

 

 

 

Fiberglass Fuel Tanks

 

NMMA is in the early stage of evaluating the effects that ethanol in gasoline has on fiberglass tanks. Boat U.S., the boater advocacy association, recently issue a consumer alert reporting that owners of older yachts have experienced leaking fiberglass fuel tanks. There have also been reports of heavy black deposits on the intake valves of marine engines resulting in bent push rods, pistons and valves. Some of the preliminary analysis conducted by an independent lab found the deposits to be di-iso octyl phalate, a chemical found in the resin, gel coat and filler used to make fiberglass fuel tanks.

 

An initial theory is that when ethanol is introduced to the fuel tank the very small ethanol molecules diffuse into pores between the resin where they dissolve the unreacted phalates. Since the phalates are in solution they are able to pass through the fuel line filters. These phalates have exceptionally high temperature stability and remain intact when the fuel evaporates in the carburetor or undergo only partial decomposition in the combustion chamber thus creating the heavy black deposits on the engine’s intake valves.

 

Unlike aluminum, NMMA has yet to identify the effect that ethanol in fuel has on the tanks integrity or even the root cause of dissolved phalates. The theory is that it is being caused by ethanol and we know that ethanol dissolves phalates, but more testing is currently being conducted.

 

Conclusion

 

As stated in the opening paragraph, the NMMA has serious safety and durability concerns with the incremental increase in ethanol content in gasoline motor fuel. The majority of marine engines in use today are open loop systems that are designed, engineered and calibrated at the factory to operate with fuel containing either 10% MTBE or ethanol. Changing the fuel that these engines were designed, engineered and calibrated for will negatively effect drivability, exhaust and evaporative emissions, and potentially damage the components.

 

While these issues are significant, the boaters have a far more serious issue. The available data indicates that aluminum and fiberglass fuel tanks and butyl rubber fuel hoses that are currently being used will fail if the ethanol content is increased to 20%. That is not an emissions issue; it is not a drivability or durability issue. It is an issue that needs to be taken far more seriously. It is a threat to the health and safety of the boaters in your state.          

 

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March 2, 2006

Safety Alert 1-06

Strike First Fire Extinguishers

Recently the U.S. Coast Guard has become aware of a recall notice for some U.S. Coast Guard approved fire extinguishers made by the Strike First Corporation of America.
Strike First has determined that the valve stem seats in a number of its 2.5 and 5 lb dry chemical fire extinguishers assembled between December 2002 and February 2004 may prevent the extinguisher from discharging properly when the lever is activated. As a result of this condition, Strike First has initiated a fire extinguisher retro-fit program for these units. Retro-fit kits are available free of charge by contacting your Strike First distributor, or by contacting Strike First directly.
The Coast Guard recommends that vessel operators verify the manufacturer of their fire extinguishers, and if applicable, take the action recommended by the manufacturer. For details visit:
http://www.strikefirstusa.com/serv_bull_002.htm 

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The following website has been established to provide information on Hurricane Katrina relief efforts: http://www.uscg.mil/katrina

 

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The following websites have been established to provide information on Hurricane Katrina relief efforts.

 
  A.  For hurricane KATRINA search and rescue - In order to assist the United States Coast Guard in hurricane KATRINA search and rescue efforts, submit a missing/stranded person request at:
http://homeport.uscg.mil/

   B.  For hurricane KATRINA media - For news about hurricane KATRINA visit:
http://www.uscgstormwatch.com/   

   C.  The hurricane KATRINA official government website for public information on finding loved ones, what to do if you are a victim, how to help victims, or disaster cleanup and agency resources, visit:
http://www.firstgov.gov/Citizen/Topics/PublicSafety/Hurricane_Katrina_Recovery.shtml

 

9/2  KATRINA
1. Coast Guard Mutual Assistance Hurricane Katrina Account

2. In the wake of the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina, there has been an outpouring of compassion for those Coast Guard members and families hard hit by this disaster in the impact area.  Many have expressed a desire to help.   

3. In response, Coast Guard Mutual Assistance (CGMA) has established an account to receive contributions designated for that specific purpose.
Contributions marked "Katrina" will be earmarked and tracked to ensure they are used first and foremost to meet the needs of Coast Guard members and families associated with Hurricane Katrina in accordance with normal CGMA policies and procedures.  In the event there are funds left over after meeting needs associated with Hurricane Katrina, they will be placed in CGMA's general account to assist members of the Coast Guard family in times of financial need. 

4. Tax deductible contributions should be made out to "Coast Guard Mutual Assistance or CGMA" by check, money order or with a credit card marked in the memo area or noted for "Katrina."  Contribution forms are available on the CGMA Web site:  www.cgmahq.org.  Click on "Contributing to CGMA."

5. Checks, payable to "CGMA" may be sent to the following address:

Coast Guard Mutual Assistance
4200 Wilson Blvd., Suite 610
Arlington, VA  22203-1804

6. Secure credit card contributions may be made online through the CGMA
Web site.  Click on "Contributing to CGMA," then on "Credit Card."

7. If you have any further questions, please contact Mr. Tom Omri at Coast Guard Mutual Assistance (202) 493-6622.


Safety Recall - Suzuki Motors - 
 Suzuki Motors has issued a recall on their outboard engines, models DF200, DF225 and DF250 in July 05. 
The recall is based on the fact that certain models have defects in the flywheel, which could and has caused serious injuries. 
All owners of Suzuki outboard engines, with the above models should read the following document: http://www.cgaux.info/g_ocx/publications/comdtnote/9000.pdf 
Peter J. Urgola, DC-V
 
 

If you are enjoying the beach this summer, please beware of RIPTIDES.

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Please be careful when operating your vessel. Since 9/11, vessels operating in the waters of the NY/NJ area have had some restrictions placed on them.
Please read these carefully.

NY SECURITY ZONES


ANY VESSEL OR PERSON IN THE WATER IS NOT AUTHORIZED IN THE FOLLOWING SECURITY ZONES:
-Within 150 yards of Liberty and Ellis Islands;
- United Nations, in the East River along the Manhattan shoreline from 125 yards offshore at the Queensboro Bridge to 175 yards offshore at East 35th Street;
- Within 25 yards of all bridge piers or abutments, overhead power cables and tunnel ventilators in the waters of the greater NY area and along the Hudson River;
- Within 100 yards of all anchored or moored Coast Guard vessels,
-Around Piers 84-96, Manhattan, bound by the following points: the northeast corner of Pier 96 where it intersects the seawall, thence to approximate position
40°46’23.1"N, 073°59’59.0"W, thence to approximate position 40°45’55.3"N, 074°00’20.2"W (NAD 1983), thence to the southeast corner of Pier 84 where it
intersects the seawall, thence along the shoreline to the point of origin; and
-The Indian Point Nuclear Power Station on the Hudson River. Within 300-yards of approximate position (41°16’12.4.N, 073°57’16.2.W). All vessels transiting
the Hudson River in the vicinity of Indian Point are subject to random Coast Guard boardings;
- All waters of Bowery and Flushing Bays within approximately 100 yards of La Guardia Airport;
- All waters of Bergen Basin north of 40 39’26.4"N;
- All waters of Thurston Basin north of 40 38’21.2"N;
- All waters of Jamaica Bay within approximately 100 yards of John F. Kennedy Airport; and
- All waters of Eastchester Bay within approximately 100 yards of Rodman Neck, south of City Island Bridge.
RECREATIONAL VESSELS ARE NOT AUTHORIZED IN THE FOLLOWING SECURITY ZONES:
-All waters between the Military Ocean and Global Marine Terminals west of the New Jersey Pier Head channel;
-Within a 25-yard radius of every waterfront facility, as defined in 33 CFR 6.01-4; and
-Within a 100-yard radius of any passenger ship, or vessel, or barge carrying petroleum, or chemical products in bulk;
================================================= 
Big boats vs. Small boats; not a fair comparison

The Coast Guard Auxiliary wants the boating public to understand that consequences of interfering with a large ship in many of our narrow channels. Especially in our busy port cities, such as New York City, Boston, Houston, Los Angeles and Seattle.

Every day, hundreds to thousands of ships; vessels larger than 65 feet in length; enter and depart our busy ports. These vessels include tankers, cruise ships, container ships and tug-barge combinations. All these vessels are constrained by their draft; and are unable to maneuver; in the narrow range inside the narrow channels in and around our ports and harbors.

The "Rules of the Road", the federal navigation rules provide for this event by giving these ships priority, or right-of-way, over smaller vessels when navigating in these narrow channels.

Many recreational boaters fail to realize the physics involved in stopping or maneuvering a large ship. The average recreational boat stops within a couple of boat lengths, even if they are traveling at maximum speed. However, it can take a large ship thousands of yards to stop.

An example would be if a water skier stopped 1,000 feet in front of a tug and barge. The skier would have less than one minute to get our of the way of the tug and barge, otherwise the skier would be run over.

In the Port of New York and New Jersey, CAPT Glenn Wiltshire, the Captain of the Port and the Commanding Officer of Sector New York said, "While I want all boaters to enjoy the waterways in our area, recent increases in reports of commercial vessels having to take evasive actions to avoid small boats in the channel are of great concern to me. I ask that all boaters be aware of their position and remain outside the main channels to ensure the continued safety of all waterway users. We don't want to wait for a tragedy to occur."

The local boating public should be aware of the penalty provisions within U.S. Code, Title 33, Section 2072, that specify "Whoever operates a vessel in violation of the navigation rules is liable to a civil penalty of not more than $5,000 for each violation, for which penalty the vessel may be seized and the case shall be brought before the district court of the United States of any district within which the vessel may be found."

Peter J. Urgola, DC-V

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NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HEADQUARTERS WASHINGTON DC 1025 AM EDT MON APR 4 2005 
SUBJECT: SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY FOR HAZARDOUS SEAS...A NEW HEADLINE...EFFECTIVE TUESDAY...AUGUST 2 2005... AT 00 UTC BEGINNING ON TUESDAY...AUGUST 2 2005...AT 00 COORDINATED UNIVERSAL TIME /UTC/...NWS WEATHER FORECAST OFFICES /WFOS/ WITH MARINE AND COASTAL RESPONSIBILITIES MAY ISSUE A NEW MARINE HAZARD HEADLINE IN THE COASTAL WATERS AND NEARSHORE MARINE FORECAST PRODUCTS...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY FOR HAZARDOUS SEAS. THE SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY FOR HAZARDOUS SEAS WILL BE ISSUED WHENEVER SEA OR WAVE CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPACT SMALL CRAFT...AND WINDS ARE EXPECTED TO REMAIN BELOW THE SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY THRESHOLD. THIS THRESHOLD FOR WIND SPEED VARIES BY NWS REGION AND IS USUALLY UNDER 20 KNOTS. THIS NEW HEADLINE DOES NOT REPLACE THE TRADITIONAL SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY HEADLINE. THE SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY WILL CONTINUE TO BE ISSUED AS A HEADLINE IN THE COASTAL WATERS FORECAST AND THE NEARSHORE MARINE FORECAST PRODUCTS FOR SIGNIFICANT WINDS AND SEAS OR WAVES. BOTH THE SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY AND THE SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY FOR HAZARDOUS SEAS MAY BE ISSUED AS HEADLINES IN THE ROUTINE COASTAL WATERS FORECAST AND NEARSHORE MARINE FORECAST BEGINNING ON TUESDAY...AUGUST 2 2005...AT 00 UTC.

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Winter Contest: What is located at

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COMING SOON:

      BOATING SKILLS & SEAMANSHIP

 

     TAUGHT BY MEMBERS OF THE

     U S  COAST GUARD AUXILIARY

 UPON COMPLETION OF THIS COURSE YOU WILL RECEIVE an ADDITIONAL 10% DISCOUNT at 
VENICE MARINA 
(excludes electronic equipment)

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